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Tender Scuffins & King Arthur Flour Self Rising Flour

If you’re reading this, you most likely like to dabble in the art (or science) of baking. And if you’re into baking, I hope you know all about King Arthur Flour and why they’re the best flour for consistant results, in my opinion. The big news in baking right now? King Arthur Flour has created an Unbleached Self Rising Flour!

Being from the South, self rising flour is something I’m pretty at home with. Biscuits, cobblers, and cakes, if we’re Southern, we make these things with self rising flour.



P.J. over at King Arthur Flour does a fabulous job of showing you the differences that you get when baking with self rising flour versus all purpose, or even with partial whole wheat, so if you’re curious, check out her blog post all about it.

I’ve had the chance to play with KAF’s self rising flour for a while now. They sent me some test samples, and I was really pleased with the results. I’ve made scones, and most recently, something I’d like to call “Scuffins”.

You see, I forgot that self rising flour has a lower protein content than all purpose flour (which is why baked goods made with it are more tender), so when I decided to make banana walnut scones, I didn’t adjust my flour accordingly to compensate for the moisture in the bananas.

Once I’d mixed the dough the way I would for a scone (including frozen, grated butter), I realized the mixture was way too wet to become a proper scone.

Rather than try to wing it and come up with an inconsistent measurement that would result from adding more flour after the fact, I baked the dough in a muffin pan.

These babies really are somewhere between a muffin and a scone – moist and tender, but slightly more stout than my traditional pancake mix muffin recipes.

While I was pulling out baking ingredients, I found my caramel bits and coconut milk powder in amongst the chocolate chips. (Yup, my pantry needs a revamp like whoa!) I decided to toss the caramel bits in along with some crunchy chopped walnuts, and used the coconut milk powder for a delicious tropical glaze. Both of these things are optional, but really amp up the flavor if you have them on hand.

I hope you’ll try the new King Arthur Self Rising Flour for yourself and see what I’m talking about when it comes to your favorite biscuit, scone, or for that matter – scuffin, recipe!


 
Disclaimer: I was asked to product test King Arthur self rising flour before it was available to purchase and provided a bag of the purchasable product for photographing purposes by the company. All opinions are my own, based on my use of the product. [wpurp-searchable-recipe]Tender Scuffins & King Arthur Flour Self Rising Flour – – – [/wpurp-searchable-recipe]
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Anne Scuffins Hartnett

Wednesday 3rd of October 2012

Hi there, my name is Anne Scuffins Hartnett and I live in a small village in Co. Cork Ireland. There are not too many of us left but we are all over the world. My grandfather fought in the Bore War and his name was George Arthur Scuffins. "I will try out your scones or should I call them Muffins" and let you know how I got on. We were never called Muffins before but I can see the funny side of it as you so aptly described the mixture LOL Kind regards Anne

Amber

Wednesday 3rd of October 2012

Oh Anne, your comment made my day. I'm glad you could see the funny side of this recipe's name. Let me know if you need any help converting to metric.

For what it's worth, I love unusual names. My maiden name was Brown, but now my surname is Bracegirdle - I married a gingerhaired boy from Blackpool, England, nearly 7 years ago now. People usually do a double take when they see it!

Allison

Tuesday 19th of June 2012

Yum! I have never bought or used self rising flour - but I think Scuffins (love the name!!) have convinced me that is necessary to try.

Amber

Tuesday 19th of June 2012

Thanks, Allison! Girl, you're in the southwest, time to put on your Southerner panties and use some self rising flour :)

Delishhh

Saturday 16th of June 2012

Oh these look amazing, funny i always use KAF, they are great!

Amber

Saturday 16th of June 2012

Me too! Thanks for stopping by, Ewa.

Tracy

Friday 15th of June 2012

Hehe, I love the idea of "scuffins!" And can you believe that I've never used self-rising flour before? Guess I need to get on that!

Amber

Saturday 16th of June 2012

Tracy, that's cus yer a Yankee! ;) I am seriously on a campaign to make you a Southerner, so time to get some KAF self rising flour.

Elizabeth

Friday 15th of June 2012

Amber, good to know about the guaranteeing issue. Maybe I'll try it one day when I run out of White Lily.

Dumb question for you: If I buy self-rising flour just to use for baking but my recipes call for regular flour, I'd then have to make sure that I don't add any of the baking powder that the recipe calls for, right? 1 Cup Flour to 1 Teaspoon Baking Powder is the self-rising formula, correct?

Thanks for the advice.

Amber

Saturday 16th of June 2012

Elizabeth, The ratio is 1/2 teaspoon baking powder to 1 cup all purpose flour. The general rule is that if the recipe calls for baking powder, you can use self rising flour and just leave the baking powder out.

Hope that helps! - Amber